< Norfolk Volcano

Monday Volcano Roundup

< Norfolk Volcano

Monday Volcano Roundup

There isn’t long to go until we erupt our firework volcano, so things are getting pretty serious. We’re going to start building the final structure this weekend, so we’ve been finalising the plans with our local builders Rob and Lewis, and spending a lot of time comparing the relative merits of different types of chicken wire (exciting stuff). We want to re-use as many second hand materials as possible, so if you know of any used dustsheets or chicken wire that are no longer needed, let us know by emailing Tahmeena.Aslam@uea.ac.uk.

Wiltshire Chicken
Yes, we need your chicken wire! Photo by protohiro.

And if you haven’t already heard, we’re also running a “Volcano Cake Off” Cake competition on eruption day. We want you to bring along your own volcano cake creations to the Festival to be judged by Tim Kinnaird, from Norwich’s very own Macarons & More! Entrants should arrive on the day at 12.15pm, and should register their entry by emailing their name, age and the name of their edible creation to 50years@uea.ac.uk. Entries are limited and registration closes Friday 20th September. Get baking!

Kid's 4th Delicious Dinosaur Swiss Butter Cream Birthday Cake home made by Barb
Good effort – but fewer dinosaurs, more volcano please! Photo by roland

In real volcano news this week, scientists have discovered a massive volcano off the coast of Japan that is similar in size to Mars’ Olympus Mons, the largest known volcano in the Solar System and smashes the previous record holder on Earth, Mauna Loa in Hawaii. The volcano, called Tamu Massif, lies 2 km below the sea, rises 3.5 km off the bottom of the sea floor and covers an area of 310,000 sq km. It formed around 145 million years ago, and as an extinct volcano, it is unlikely to erupt again – phew!

And finally, some news from our own volcano, Mount Merapi, which has been transformed into a musical instrument. A team of artists have built an instrument (essentially a synthesizer) which transforms the variations in wind, heat and moisture that the volcano experiences into sound via electronic circuits. For example, if the wind becomes stronger, the sound may rise in pitch. If it becomes weaker, then the pitch of the sound goes down. You can here an example of the volcano “singing” here:

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